Risk Disclosure

Hypothetical performance results have many inherent limitations, some of which are described below. No representation is being made that any trading account will or is likely to achieve profits or losses similar to those shown, in fact, there are frequently sharp differences between hypothetical  trading performance results and the actual results subsequently achieved by any particular trading program.

One of the limitations of hypothetical trading performance results is that they are generally prepared the benefit of hindsight. In addition, hypothetical trading does not involve financial risk, and no hypothetical trading record can completely account for the impact of financial risk in actual trading. For example, the ability to withstand losses or to adhere to a particular trading program in spite of trading losses are material points which can also adversely affect actual trading results. There are numerous other factors related to the markets in general or to the implementation of any specific  trading program which cannot be fully accounted for in the preparation of hypothetical forex trading performance results, and all of which can adversely affect actual forex trading results.

Past results of NetPicks are not indicative of future performance.

The monthly and composite annual results should be viewed as hypothetical.

In reality, the results do not represent the track record of the methodology originator or subscribers. This also means there is no guarantee that one applying these methodologies would have the same results as posted. Since trading  successfully depends on many elements including but not limited to a trading methodology and trader’s on psychology, our website does not make any representation whatsoever that the above mentioned trading systems might be or is suitable or profitable for you.

In addition, it’s important to understand and accept that there can be data outages and server failures. The brokers system might not be functional, the auto trading servers might have technical difficulties and there may be times where communication between accounts, the broker and the auto-trade program are not functioning properly. This can lead to greater risk. Markets also do not always guarantee exact fills. Periods of fast markets can cause greater degrees of slippage and less than ideal fills. There can be no guarantee that your account will always be able to enter and exit the programs ideal entry or exit point.

Futures Transactions in futures involve the obligation to make, or to take, delivery of the underlying asset of the contract at a future date, or in some cases to settle the position with cash.

They carry a high degree of risk.

The ‘gearing’ or ‘leverage’ often obtainable in futures trading means that a small deposit or down payment can lead to large losses as well as gains. It also means that a relatively small movement can lead to a proportionately much larger movement in the value of your investment, and this can work against you as well as for you. Futures transactions have a contingent liability and investors should be aware of the implications of this. In general, the value of a future depends upon price movements in the underlying asset.

Thus, many of the risks applicable to trading the underlying asset apply equally to the future applicable to such asset. Futures are also exposed to liquidity risk.

Options

There are many different types of options with different characteristics subject to the following conditions. Buying options: Buying options involves less risk than selling options because, if the price of the underlying asset moves against you, investors can simply allow the option to lapse. The maximum loss is limited to the premium, plus any commission or other transaction charges. However, if investors buy a call option on a futures contract and investors later exercise the option, they will acquire the future. This will expose investors to the risks described under ‘futures’ and ‘contingent liability investment transactions’.

Writing options: If investors write an option, the risk involved is considerably greater than buying options. Investors may be liable for margin to maintain their position and a loss may be sustained well in excess of the premium received. By writing an option, investors accept a legal obligation to purchase or sell the underlying asset if the option is exercised against them however far the market price has moved away from the exercise price. If you already own the underlying asset which you have contracted to sell (when the options will be known as ‘covered call options’) the risk is reduced. If you do not own the underlying asset (‘uncovered call options’) the risk can be unlimited. Only experienced persons should contemplate writing uncovered options, and then only after securing full details of the applicable conditions and potential risk exposure.

Traditional options: Certain member firms under special exchange rules write a particular type of option called a ‘traditional option’. These may involve greater risk than other options.

Two way prices are not usually quoted and there is no exchange market on which to close out an open position or to effect an equal and opposite transaction to reverse an open position. It may be difficult to assess its value or for the seller of such an option to manage his exposure to risk. Certain options markets operate on a margined basis, under which buyers do not pay the full premium on their option at the time they purchase it. In this situation you may subsequently be called upon to pay margin on the option up to the level of your premium. If you fail to do so as required, your position may be closed or liquidated in the same way as a futures position.

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